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Found 4 results

  1. Hello! I'm a relatively small YouTube channel! I just started a few days ago, and i'm not so sure about fair use laws yet; despite doing research. Generally I gathered it's always good to ask for permission if you're unsure! So, I'm hoping this would be the right place to ask, because i need permission to publish a review of Dying Light! So, Techland could i use the footage i captured of Dying Light in my review of the game? I know i need permission to monetize my videos! So that's why i'm asking! I appreciate you taking the time to read this, and i will respect whatever decision you choose to make!
  2. Sam Powers

    My Rating

    Hey everyone, thanks for taking the time to look into this post. I recently realized that when i joined these forums i never laid down a foundation of what i thought about dying light, i just delve right into throwing my opinions out there! So this post is for me to lay down that foundation! I like to rate games based on my own little rating system, similar to gameinformers rating system, accept mines a little different. In a day and age where many many games have the same basic theme (zombie games, war games, sports), its hard to find a good quality game that introduces new things each year, as expected, with so many game developers out there, gaming is a large, and growing, industry. The good games today, ive noticed, have something different about them. For example, Call of duty's zombie mode, or madden and fifa's and others sports games online team mode, or how about destiny altogether! These games are made great by what they do that separates them from the other games along the same theme. So in my rating system, i award a point in different categories that the game does differently and well. if a game has multiplayer, but theres nothing special about it, it gets no points. for instance, call of duty's multiplayer from MW2 to MW3 hardly changed, therefore i would give MW3 no points in the multiplayer category. heres how i break it down: Rating System Gameplay (2 points available) Storyline (3 points available) Multiplayer (3 points max) Realism (1 point) Miscellaneous (1 point) important, most games that i think are good end up with a rating of 5, because of the weird way i rate them. Now that you know how my rating system works, lets jump into the Review. Im gonna start by saying that Dying Light is one of my most favorite games of all time, among those of Call of Duty, Destiny, and other tier 1 games. its got good gameplay, feels realistic and has a very different kind of multiplayer. As for gameplay, a zombie game cant be a zombie game in third person, its just not the same. Every zombie gamer loves the close relationships and personal feelings they have with their beloved zombies. Techland only put a few guns in this game, usually used to dispatch Rais's men, and occasionally to get over that goon or demolisher youre struggling with, but melee weapons are always of the favor in this game that combines hack and slash with free running movements. and might i metion, Techland did a PHENOMENAL job at combining these two elements. Although this game has its fair share of glitches, its gameplay is nearly glitch free. now the storyline, or "campaign" if you must insist. In my opinion the storyline to this game is absolutely phenomenal as well. just the right amounts of twists and turns, but overall giving you a good idea of what direction the game is going. the bad guys stay bad and the good guys stay good, but there are often times when you find yourself as the gamer questioning whether or not a, certain character, will take a trip on the merry-go-round-and-dont-come-back. With its wide selection of side missions to keep the gamer busy after completion of the main story, its re playable X 10, not only that, but there are challenges as well and a great wide open world to explore, and PLENTY of collectibles for those gamers. Multiplayer. Ohhhhh multiplayer... listen techland, the co-op is great, you did a really good job with it. This game is great with friends. And we all love the co-op challenges that pop up in game (sorry drawing a blank on those thingses names). And were all happy that you made us able to change their frequency and change our game to friends only or public. yah did good. But please, please, continue your work on the Be the Zombie mode. Many gamers are unhappy with it, including myself, yet i still have so much fun with it when it goes well. I know youre working on a patch, and that fixing BTZ is a process, i just cant wait for that process to be complete! Realism. the good thing about dying light, and a big reason i fell in love with it so quickly, is that the characters lines are actually kind of realistic. only a few stupid lines, compared to most games nearly all of their lines are dumb. and the engine you used was very realistic, heck its definitely got the right name, "natural movement." Miscellaneous. the game has quite a few what i call menu glitches. such as save glitches and those pesky duplication glitches. i usually allow a game a few glitches, but when it interferes with the quality of the game... The Verdict Gameplay scores 2 out of 2 for having a great engine, and combining hack n slash and parkour perfectly. Storyline scores 3 out of 3 for having a storyline with just the right amount of twists and turns, and a great ending, along with plenty of interesting side quests Multiplayer scores 1 out of 3 for having fantastic co-op, and a different sort of (great idea) multiplayer. however i took one point away for poorly creating that multiplayer. Realism scores 1 out of 1 with natural movement and realistic lines Miscellaneous scores -1 out of 1 for having many menu glitches that interfere with game quality. Overall Dying Light scores a 6 If the developers can fix the glitches, improve the be the zombie mode, and score one more point in miscellaneous, itd be a perfect game! Thanks for reading Sam Powers
  3. I am not a professional journalist and rarely write reviews, but once in a while, a game will entice me to do so. Dying Light happens to be one of these few. I hope you enjoy the review! Allow me to introduce... Dying light! As you likely already know, Dying Light is an open world action/RPG with a zombie/parkour theme. There's heavy emphasis on scavenging, looting, parkouring, exploring and last but not least; tons of combat. The story begins with your character (Kyle Crane) being dropped in a quarantine zone. You're a GRE operative and your goal is to secure a stolen file. In the drop process, you're hurt and rescued by survivors occupying “the tower†a sort of high-rise stronghold. In my opinion, the story does a good job at giving you a reason to play the game and has kept my interest, whereas usually open-world game related stories do not. This is a spoiler-free review, so my description of the story and characters stops there. What you'll be doing a lot of: Fighting, exploring, scavenging and RUNNING! For those of you who played Dead Island, yes, this is developed by the same company. And yes, it borrows heavily from the previous formula, however it is NOT the same game. Everything, and I do mean everything has been improved, across the board with tons of new gameplay elements inserted in between. So, picture a far better designed Dead Island experience and layer it with tons of extra goodness. Combat was arguably the high point in the Dead Island games because it was visceral and fun - well it's been cranked to 11 in this game. Did you enjoy beating that zombie with a boat paddle? Well, you get to do it more often and with a lot more variety and it's WAY more fun than it was before! For example, not only can you dismember and behead zombies depending on where you hit them with your sharp weapons, you can also split them in half vertically. If that doesn't sound satisfying on paper, it's because you have to do it in the game to get the full effect. Best of all, when you do score such a critical hit, the game momentarily slows down in such a perfect way as to not break the action, but let you take in the full effect of your hit in gory splendor. It never gets old, much like drop-kicking zombies from rooftops or combining fast-paced parkour with a grappling hook to zip around the city. Many other combat moves can be learned via the skill trees. You can slide and break legs, or grapple zombies and score high points with environmental kills by throwing (or kicking) them into spiked barricades and such. You can alter two-handed weapons to give you extra moves like ground pound and whirlwind. Guns make their way into the game, but unlike Dead Island, once they do show up, they work quite well, especially against certain enemy types and ammo is very easy and cheap to access. All vendors will start selling all gun ammo types once you reach a specific point (or level) in the game. More details on the game mechanics, skill trees, and night time While the game obviously has a heavy emphasis on fast-paced action-style combat, it's very much an RPG as well. You have three large skill trees to unlock and your choices (especially at first) have a large impact on how the game will play out. You have tons of collectibles and weapons can not only be modded (i.e. fire, lightning, toxic, impact effects) but they can be upgraded as well. Best of all, you no longer need to do this at a workbench; all modding and repairs can be done in the field. Going back to the skill trees, if you do all the side-quests and explore a ton, you will eventually unlock everything. It really depends on how much side questing and exploring you do. The first tree is the survivor tree, which represents the typical XP you gain, like most RPGs. You complete missions or side-quests or save some poor survivors out in the world and get survival points. The other two trees, power and agility level up mostly from actually using your skills. If you climb, jump and parkour, you get agility points. If you dispatch zombies, either by fire, explosives, bullets or good old melee, you get power points. Simple yet very effective and rewarding. Each tree allows for tiered skills with a mix of passive and actives to be unlocked as you play. It's done very well and each point feels like it carries plenty of weight. One of the biggest changes in Dying Light's gameplay mechanics comes in the form of night time. When the sun sets, things get crazy, most notably the zombies. If you thought the daytime zombies, lumbering around almost aimlessly were on the dull side, well, just you wait. As you explore and complete quests, time advances and keeping track of this is key. This is where Dying Light's lighting system really comes into play as well. The world looks amazing as the sun is just about to set, and it's difficult to miss the queues. Once night time comes, a special killer breed of zombies called volatiles come out to play. They behave like wolves; they hunt in packs and shriek if attacked to call upon their decaying brethren for assistance. They're fast, powerful and tough to take down. You don't want to let them close in on you, meaning, most of the time you want to run away from them. The game balances this out by showing you these zombies on your mini-map, complete with a vision cone to show you where they're looking. You can also hold the survival sense button (which also helps you locate loot) and see their ghostly images through walls and objects. You will eventually master how to avoid them, but if one notices you and calls his buddies, you'd better run. When you do, you'll feel the dread and excitement. If you manage to escape you'll be rewarded with bonus skill points for breaking pursuit. While you're running, you can also hold a button to look backwards, slowing down time for a short burst. Unlockable skills even allow you to use your UV light to temporarily stun volatiles, or throw something at them. As you level up, you'll have access to skills that allow to more easily deal with this crazy breed of zombies. You'll also progress in terms of weaponry and gadgets. My favorite is the camouflage skill. You basically smear yourself with a recently killed zombie in order to temporarily blend in, or even kill other zombies. The screen turns red and your character complains in disgust as you do it too! So yeah, night time is nerve-wracking and really changes the entire world you're used to seeing during daytime. It's brilliant. The game also rewards you with double the skill points at night if you parkour or attack zombies and the longer you stay out, the more survival points you are rewarded (you want survival points btw). Make it for the whole night without dying and you get a nice dose of survival points, which plays into Dying Light's excellent Risk VS Reward mechanic. If you don't like being out at night, just find a safe house (you unlock these during the day to use them) and sleep through the night. It's as easy as that. There's no limit to how many days you can do this while you're playing the game and there's ample warnings for when night is going to happen. Side Questing and additional content Apart from main story and side quests, there are also random events that happen as you explore. Don't worry - no eagles or honey badgers here! Occasionally you'll see a blue prompt flash on your mini-map. If you have the time (or feel like it) you can make your way and find out what's going on. Some of the time, you'll be tasked to save a survivor from a pack of zombies. Other times, some of the bad guy's men will be kicking the snot out of a survivor for fun. You'll also encounter random characters who have stories to tell or travelling merchants. It's almost always worth doing these for the loot and experience and more importantly, the events never seem distracting; they're not in your face, and they're optional. Other events include airdrops. You'll hear the planes before you see them, and they'll drop special packages that you need to get to. If you're there first, you get both crates and turning them in yields a huge amount of survivor points. Get there a bit late though and you'll run into the bad guy's men and consequently need to fight them off in order to claim your prize. You will also occasionally see a shield icon on the mini-map. These are escort quests. Now, before you get scared away, 95% of escort quests are actually really fun, well done and offer some humorous exchanges between you and the escorted. In other words, do them all. They also offer great rewards. Adding to all the side content, there are also optional indoor areas called quarantine zones. These are quite tough and meant to be done after you've gained some levels, skills and gear but are quite rewarding and offer some tense moments. Side quests will often have you going into indoor areas which I assume aren't accessible normally. This makes side questing quite rewarding, as indoor areas are super-tense and fun. This is another notable change from Dead Island - lots of indoor areas and they're quite varied. Some are sewers, buildings, underground subway stations, underground parking garages, bunkers… You get the idea. Graphics, world details, engine and audio: WOW! Dying Light's world feels like it's been lovingly crafted by a really talented crew of artists and level crafters. Each area seems unique. While you may see some home and building layouts repeat a bit, it's quite impressive how much detail is mashed into the two large areas, and those who wish to explore and discover will have almost too much to take in. Scavenging the game-world for weapons, cash and crafting materials is a big part of the experience. When you enter homes, they feel like they were lived in and abandoned in haste, which means you'll see a lot of disturbing things (and DO plenty as well). You are, after all, in a quarantined area where zombies have taken over. The visual details are gorgeous and the lighting system has left me in awe more than once; causing me to stop and take in my surroundings and admire the engine and the artist's work. The world seems alive even though it's surrounded by death. Trees and plants move in the wind and rain at night… Rain at night has never looked so realistic; you can almost smell it. Night is also scary as hell, but more on that later. The game is full of visual and auditory details that just make it a pleasure to play through. Little things like how your vision darkens around the edge of the screen as you struggle to catch your breath. You'll gasp and almost panic when you're being chased by volatiles at night. Your character's fear seems to transcend your TV and speaker setup and cut right through you, immersing you in the experience. Seeing as I'm playing the PS4 version (not sure if Xbox one has this function but I assume it does) there's a speaker on the PS4 controller and very little games take advantage of it. In Dying Light, you'll hear weapon reloads, watch beeps (to indicate impending darkness) and radio chatter. You'll hear the click-click from your flashlight. These are small details, but they also contribute to the overall excellent immersion the game provides. The game's audio and music is fantastically done, including most voice tracks as well. I have a beefy audio receiver and speakers but it seems like games seldom take advantage of the setup. Dying light is no slouch in this department. Everything has the right amount of bass and mix, like gunshots and explosions. Perhaps even too much, but I won't cite that as a complaint. Zombies that are newly infected will sometimes momentarily regain some humanity and sob or plead for their lives, causing you to occasionally hesitate before delivering the killing blow. They'll also break out of nearby doors or manholes while shrieking horribly, in an attempt to get your blood pumping. The bigger zombies wielding chunks of concrete as maces will slam down and it almost feels like they're physically present. Music tracks are not overplayed and always seem perfectly fitting; I especially love the title track. It has that eerie synth style that some Mass Effect tracks also share. Often times while you're in the optional quarantine zones or scary indoor areas, music tracks will queue up and just seem perfect. Kudos to the audio department at Techland; you guys have done what precious little other developers can do in this department. Minor gripes and conclusion: While Dying Light may be my favorite release in recent months (and is likely to stay that way looking at upcoming releases) it isn't a perfect experience. However, my issues with the game are very minor compared with how much fun I'm having as a whole. If you like doing most of the side quests as they come along, you'll find yourself quite powerful even before reaching the game's 2nd area. I am certainly not invincible and still die quite frequently, but regular zombies (biters?) and human enemies have become quite easy to defeat. It would have been nice to have some form of scaling, even if it's just to beef certain enemies up at specific and higher survival levels. For those of you who really like the feeling of becoming powerful, you'll have it in droves if you like to do all the optional content. While the parkour is excellent, my character will occasionally do unexpected moves that guarantee my death, like miss a ledge I was clearly aiming for, or jump backwards when I wanted to do a grab. Luckily these are rare but when they happen, they can be frustrating. I'm at the very last mission now, max level and have tons of cash but nothing to spend it on, and I'm barely scavenging anymore and rarely ever loot corpses. It would have been nice to have something to spend cash on other than just buying materials and weapons. Speaking of weapons, near the end of the game, there isn't very much variety from the vendors. It all seems to be the same sword types and blunt weapons or picks seem to never be present in shops. This is likely easily addressed in a future patch, so fingers crossed. Those minor issues are all I can really think of. The rest of the game more than makes up for these small issues. The PS4 version has never crashed on me once nor did I run into any game breaking bugs. In conclusion, the game has been a blast and I look forward to replaying it, either in New Game+ or just restarting a fresh save. I can't comment on co-op since I haven't tried it yet, but by all accounts on the Reddit thread, people seem to love it and on the PS4 it seems to function well. People seem to expect numbered ratings on reviews, and I feel Dying Light easily deserves a 9 out of 10. So what are you waiting for? Grab yourself a copy and start dismembering some undead! -Written by Jorlen
  4. Trane-1723

    My Review Of Dying Light

    I have already accumulated over 40 hours on this game. That's not to say there hasnt been issues, which for the most part have been very minor. These have been: one audio cut out, master scavenger outfit not showing up, and I am unable to reach survivor level 25 as it glitches. All of which I'm sure will be fixed, and addressed. I have seen many people gripe over the game, but I can clearly say almost all their gripes I have seen are minor issues (except for some PC player issues) or are the result of lack of understanding. This game can be short with a 10 hour story, but I highly recommend diving into the full of the game. At the start you are weak, slow, and being on ground level all, but spells death. Slowly, but surely based off your play style you get better. This game accomplishes a very fine line in this aspect as you will accumulate skills to a point you will forget about some, but that's a good thing. Its not too much to feel overwhelming, but just enough. The game is beautiful, and many times at the highest points I will take a moment to take it all in before heading back into the action. The map is big enough you might realize when looking at it you haven't explored it all. Many times I had to actively make my goal to head a new direction to explore it all. The parkour is the best I have played in a game. As a real practitioner of parkour I can say it is all I could have wanted. Something to make you feel badass, but not too much flair. The game has a real sense of realism to it as much as possible. I found myself in a smoke filled quarantine area taking damage. So I crouched down only to find like in real life the clean air is down low. I'm not saying its purely realistic, but its nice touches like these that make me smile. It loses realism where it needs to. It takes the players fun as its top priority. From being a weak, but agile night hunter, to jumping off the bridge into water or onto a vans roof. I rate this game a 9/10, and I hope to see what the future DLC will add.